Cornish Rex

Similar in appearance to a Siamese or Hairless cat, this breed is athletic with short curly hair in multiple colors and patterns. The cornish rex are very sociable, affectionate and loyal cats that can be very playful and energetic. 

With short hair, these cats are among the easiest to groom and clean up after. The color of the coat can vary, as well as the pattern. They can live up to 15 years with a good diet and the correct exercise.  

Cornish Rex
Cornish Rex
Cornish Rex
Weight: 6 to 10 pounds Height: 8 to 12 inches
Life span: 11 to 15 years
Intelligence: High Temperament: social, brave
Playfulness: high Activity level: hyper
Vocalness: frequent Coat length: short
Shedding amount: infrequent
Good with:
Traits:

High-energy calls for high quantities of food, but many owners set food out that’s readily available. This way the cats can roam and recharge on calories as they need without meowing excessively at their owners.

This breed is friendly towards other pets, strangers, family members and is extremely loyal. They have a happy and friendly personality and will do well alone and with lots of company around. 

Seniors should not adopt or rescue because they have a high activity level and may require more attention than they could give.

With plenty of intelligence and energy, having plenty of levels in the home to explore will be ideal. Some places may need to be cat-proofed to stop them from exploring where they shouldn’t — aka the food cupboard.

Cornish Rex

Apartment living may be cramped for this zoomy breed, but cats are adaptable to most spaces. As long as they have plenty of entertainment and care they should do well in apartments, houses or any home.

Because they have short hair, keeping them warm with comfortable sleeping spots or clothes may be necessary if you live in a colder region. 

These cats have plenty of energy and lots of intelligence, games, and toys will be their favorite. 

Exploring is high on this breed’s agenda, so creating fun and exciting spaces will make them happy — scratch posts, castles, and cat structures are recommended. 

They are sociable and friendly, while their energy may keep them from sleeping in an owner’s lap constantly, their loyalty and affection doesn’t let them wander too far.

With high intelligence, some separation training in their early years also enables them to be independent and happy alone for longer periods of time. 

This breed doesn’t suffer any major and common health concerns and can live up to 20 years in some cases. Despite being a healthy breed, routine vet visits are still advised as cats are great at masking the pain they might have.

Their hair may fall out in older age, making them more hairless — comfy sweaters and coats are any easy fixes though.

Advantages:

  • Low maintenance and grooming
  • Affectionate and independent
  • Healthy breed

Disadvantages:

  • Sometimes very vocal
  • High energy may be disruptive in some cases – not ideal for seniors. 

Origin

United Kingdom

Health

Dr. Adedapo Adisa:

The Cornish rex cats are known for their unique curly coats and striking appearance. Native to England and formed from a mutation of the British shorthair, Cornish rex cats do not have guard hairs, making them susceptible to environmental conditions like heat or cold.

Because of their long and lanky limbs, the Cornish rex cats are referred to as the greyhounds of cats. They have a significant genetic pool due to being crossed with numerous cat breeds in the past, which has placed them in good health and a life expectancy range of 14-20 years.

Despite being known as a hardy breed and relatively healthy, the Cornish rex cats also have few inherited health conditions associated with them. They include; Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the Cornish rex breeds is an inherited condition that affects the heart's muscles. The muscular walls of the left ventricle, which is the part of the heart that pumps out blood, becomes thickened, thereby losing its contractile ability and pumping attributes 

Subsequently, the upper part of the left ventricle (left atrium) begins to expand and holds unto more blood, causing blood to clot, as well as fluid accumulating within the lungs. This subsequent effect leads to congestive heart failure.

A potential effect of clots formed in the upper atrium is that this clot could break into tiny pieces and lodge or block various blood vessels, especially the limbs.

If the condition is not managed correctly in the Cornish rex cats, this would progress and cause heart failure. Some common signs of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the Cornish rex cats are;

 

● Irregular heart rates.

● Cardiac murmurs in cats.

● Cats with this condition don't tolerate exercises.

● Fluid accumulation in the lungs.

● Some cats could show signs of lameness and paralysis due to clots occluding a blood vessel.

● General weakness and panting in the cats.

 

Although this condition is known to be inherited, if the Cornish rex cats show symptoms related to this health issue, it is essential to schedule an appointment with your veterinarian to increase the chances of a good prognosis (expected outcome of a condition).

Another health condition the Cornish rex cats are known for is an umbilical hernia, where there is a defect or opening in the abdominal muscles. This causes the intestine to protrude out. This is majorly caused by incomplete closure of the umbilical region after birth.

Although not sure if it's a genetic condition in the Cornish rex cats because the last case was seen in 1997. However, there have not been reported cases of umbilical hernia in the Cornish rex cats.

Before engaging in breeding activities, the Cornish rex cat should be screened for Inherited medical conditions, and if found positive for them, they should not proceed into breeding programs.

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