Scottish Fold Cat Breed Information, Facts, & Health

Scottish Folds originated as a spontaneous mutation in Scottish farm cats. They are amiable, observant, devoted but not demanding felines which makes them the perfect pet. 

Their most noticeable characteristic is their small ears which fold forward and downward, giving them a mischievous, playful look. 

Scottish Folds are highly intelligent, soft-spoken, and easy-going cats. They effortlessly adapt to new people and situations. These cats are very loyal, affectionate, and tend to bond with only one family member in the household. 

Scottish Folds allow other people to cuddle and caress them as they adore attention, but only when they want it. They are not needy cats that are up in your face and would rather prefer to sit next to you than on your lap. 

Scottish Fold
Scottish Fold

Quick facts about the Scottish Fold

Weight: 6 to 13 pounds Height: 8 to 10 inches
Life span: 11 to 14 years
Intelligence: high Temperament: social
Playfulness: Activity level:
Vocalness: Coat length:
Shedding amount:
Good with: kids | families | other cats
Traits: Scottish Fold cats are usually friendly and sociable animals that enjoy to spend time with people and other animals. They also enjoy playing with toys and other objects, such as sticks or balls.

These felines are fairly playful throughout their lifespan and occasionally enjoy a game of catch. They are not highly active and energetic cats, but neither are they couch potatoes.

Scottish Folds are friendly with children and other pets and make the ideal family companion. 

Although their ears are folded, they are still very expressive. When a Scottish Fold is angry, they will lay back their ears. But as soon as they hear a can of food open, their ears quickly lift. It’s worth taking note that the fold in their ears becomes less pronounced when they are feeling ill or upset. 

Scottish Folds are medium-sized sturdy cats with a rounded, well-padded body. They have a circular face with a strong chin and jaw. Their round heads blend into their short, thick necks. Scottish Folds have protruding cheeks, with the males having a jowly appearance. 

They have a short, broad nose with a slight curve and small folded ears with rounded tips. 

Scottish Fold

There is always a sweet expression in their big, round eyes. You will notice that their eye color matches their coat color. 

Scottish Folds have short, rough legs with perfectly rounded toes. They have 5 toes in front and 4 behind. 

Their tail length varies from medium to long but should be in proportion to their body mass. They have lively tails with rounded tips. 

A Scottish Fold coat can be either medium or long. Their coats are dense and soft in texture. Their fur stands away from their body due to the density. The texture of their coat depends on the color or regional and seasonal changes. 

You can find Scottish Folds in many colors, including tabby, tortoiseshell, and calico patterns. 

Origin

Scotland

Health

Dr. Adedapo Adisa:

The Scottish fold cats have their origin rooted in Scotland, with distinguishing characteristics of the breed having ears that fold forward. The ear fold results from a natural genetic mutation affecting the body cartilages and the ear, giving the Scottish fold an owlish appearance.

Scottish fold cats were formerly called Lop-eared cats, are seen as a healthy cat breed and have a life expectancy of 12-15 years.

Certain genetic conditions are found in the Scottish fold cat breed. They include polycystic kidney disease (PKD) affecting the kidney and also osteochondrodysplasia affecting bones, cartilages, and joints in Scottish folds.

Polycystic kidney disease is an inherited condition that affects the kidney of the Scottish fold cat breed. This health issue arises due to a defective gene leading to cyst formation (fluid-containing cavities) on the kidney. As the Scottish fold ages, cyst increases in size but leads to kidney failure.

Scottish fold cats with polycystic kidneys present with a couple of symptoms which include;

● Increased water intake.

● Increase in urination.

● Blood may be present in urine

● Foul breath, which is called uremic breathe.

● Fluid may accumulate around the limbs and abdomen.

It is essential to report to your veterinarian immediately if any of these symptoms have been present in the Scottish fold cats. 

A veterinarian might carry out tests to reach a diagnosis; it is also important to conduct a DNA test to identify if the mutant gene causing polycystic kidney disease is present. 

If positive, the Scottish fold cat from further participating in breeding activities.

Another inherited condition seen in the Scottish fold cat is osteochondrodysplasia. In this condition, the bones and cartilages are affected due to the dominant defective gene leading to abnormalities of bones and cartilages. 

These abnormalities progress into a more severe condition in the cats, such as inflammation of the bones and joints, which comes with severe pains in the Scottish fold cats.

Some signs to watch out for in the Scottish fold cats with osteochondrodysplasia are;

● Joints of the elbow or knee may appear swollen.

● Pain around joints on touch.

● Partial paralysis or lameness.

● Cats may show reluctance to walk it Jump.

● Abnormal gaits can be observed.

If one or more of these signs have been observed in the Scottish fold cats, it is essential to notify your veterinarian, who would carry out a couple of diagnostic tests, such as an x-ray, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the affected limbs, to assess the situation.

Management plans for osteochondrodysplasia in the Scottish fold cats would be based on findings from the test conducted. However, Scottish fold cats diagnosed with this osteochondrodysplasia should be removed from breeding activities.

Leave a Comment